5 Secrets You Should Know Before Applying For Jobs

In this day and age it seems that just about everybody and their mother are on the hunt for the ideal high paying job with tons of benefits. While we are all on the search for that perfect job, it might not always come as easy as we expect. Job searching takes some patience and finding the job you love and will stick with for years comes with some work.  

As of September 2016, Ireland’s unemployment rate is at 7.9 percent. If you compare that to our neighbors in the UK with an unemployment rate of 4.9 percent, Ireland is a whole 3 percent higher. While this has dropped from 9.7 percent from April 2015, that still leaves roughly around 200,000 people unemployed.  

Applying for jobs can be a stressful task, so to help you out I have put together the top 5 most important things to do before you start the hunt.

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Use Your Networking

Many people believe the best way to find a job is to comb over the internet, using website like Craigslist or Monster to find openings. While this is a great start to the search, you should also be aware that many other job hunters are doing the same thing. One of the best ways to start your search is simply by asking around through people you already know. Weather it is through co-workers from your previous jobs, friends on your sports club, your brother in law, or even your new friend you made at the pub the other night, these people already have an inside to the company you are trying to work for. Networking through these people also gives you a leg up on anyone else applying without inside connections.

Update Your CV

Having a strong CV is a crucial part to the job hunt. The standard for a good resume might not be the same as it was three years ago when you first applied for a job. It is extremely important that you are constantly updating your resume. Focus on past accomplishments you have made and have made you successful. It is also important to make sure the content on your resume fits in with the job you are applying for. For example if you are applying for a job as a salesman it would make more sense to include that in the past you helped raise sales 5 percent in your first three months, instead of including how much of a hard worker you can be.

Keep An Open Mind

Job hunting includes having an open mind and remembering that you might not find exactly what you’re looking for, and that is ok! The sad truth behind it is, with the growth of technology and a higher percentage of college graduates, the job market out there is getting thinner and thinner. This involves keeping an open mind while searching for that perfect job. The jobs you find may not be paying as much as you would like to receive while starting, or the job you’ve been dreaming of may just be part-time or freelance work. This shouldn’t stop you from doing something you love to do. If you are passionate about your job continue to work at it and if your work is good enough the job openings will find itself.

Clean Up Your Social Media

This should go without saying, but having professional social media accounts greatly increases your chances of getting hired. One of the first things most employers will do is google your name or look you up on Facebook and Twitter. If all they see is pictures of you out at the club with your friends, they might get the impression that you are not dedicated to your work even if you are. This is not to say that you should delete all of your accounts. Many employers will still be looking for people who are active and know how to use these platforms

Do Your Research

You can’t expect to pass your exam without doing your homework. This phrase can apply to the job application world too. Doing your homework or researching your company you are applying for before an interview can help show that you mean business. Along with researching your business it will also help to research things like your competitor’s, current business trends, the job marketing and anything and everything related to your work to show that you are a knowledgeable potential employee.

About the author

Craig Marshall


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