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World Book Week! Read a book with us

Child Reading for World Book Week

Yesterday (April 23) was World Book Day but Babylon is celebrating the entire week!

This day is dedicated to promoting reading, publishing and copyrights. Today, people from all over the world celebrate and recognize the scope of books: a link between the past and the future, a bridge between generations and between cultures.

April 23 was not chosen at random, it is a symbolic date in world literature. It is the date in which several important authors died: William Shakespeare, Miguel Cervantes and Inca Garcilaso de la Vega. UNESCO chose it in 1995 to pay a worldwide tribute to books and authors, encouraging everyone to access the books.

bookcase-books-bookshelves-159711 for world book day

International Book Day

Some people like to read biographies. Some people like novels that give them chills. And, some others prefer the classics. But, regardless of the type of books that one likes, the indisputable truth is that the world would not be the same without books.

How to celebrate World Book Week with us

  1. The best way to celebrate this day would be to find the time to read a little. Do you have a book that you can not finish? Today is the time to lie on the sofa or a blanket outside with a cup of coffee and enjoy the last page.
  2. If you have children, this could be the perfect day to teach them about the joys of reading.
  3. Another way to go about celebrating this day would be to get together with some friends for a reading of a book you all love.

Here, I will leave you my list of the top 5 all times fave:

But hope you can give me yours in the comments!

1. Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder

One day fourteen-year-old Sophie Amundsen comes home from school to find in her mailbox two notes, with one question on each: “Who are you?” and “Where does the world come from?” From that irresistible beginning, Sophie becomes obsessed with questions that take her far beyond what she knows of her Norwegian village.

2. Perfume by Patrick Süskind

In the slums of eighteenth-century France, the infant Jean-Baptiste Grenouille is born with one sublime gift—an absolute sense of smell. As a boy, he lives to decipher the odours of Paris and apprentices himself to a prominent perfumer who teaches him the ancient art of mixing precious oils and herbs. But Grenouille’s genius is such that he is not satisfied to stop there, and he becomes obsessed with capturing the smells of objects such as brass doorknobs and fresh-cut wood. Then one day he catches a hint of a scent that will drive him on an ever-more-terrifying quest to create the “ultimate perfume”—the scent of a beautiful young virgin.

3. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

It tells the story of the Buendia family, and chronicles the irreconcilable conflict between the desire for solitude and the need for love—in rich, imaginative prose that has come to define an entire genre known as “magical realism.”

4. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

With a timeless charm, it tells the story of a little boy who leaves the safety of his own tiny planet to travel the universe, learning the vagaries of adult behaviour through a series of extraordinary encounters. His personal odyssey culminates in a voyage to Earth and further adventures.

5. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

Lord Henry Wotton makes Dorian Gray believe that the only thing important in life is beauty. However, Dorian realizes that he will become less beautiful as he grows older. He wishes the portrait Basil painted would become old in his place. Dorian then sells his soul so he can be beautiful forever, but not on purpose.

**Synopsis from GoodReads.

Would you agree with my list? What books are in your top 5?

 

Today we hope it is full of books, books and more books.
An if you are into Poetry, there are few new artists writing poetry for the millennial age. Check them out here.

As is the wish of Unesco, lets all highlight the power of books to promote open and inclusive knowledge societies.

HAPPY READING!

About the author

Andreina Gonzalez

I am Andreina from Venezuela, I am a journalist finishing my master's degree in Journalism and Public Relations at Griffith College. I like photography, writing and calligraphy.


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